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Blog for Parents and Teachers

What is Critical Thinking?

by Jon Guy
Misconceptions about critical thinking include beliefs such as “We are all born critical thinkers” or “Critical thinking comes naturally” or “I’m a critical thinker because I question authority.”

How Arguments Can Go Wrong

by Stephanie Simoes
There are two main ways an argument can go wrong.

How Flawed Arguments Can Go Right

by Stephanie Simoes
Sometimes, flawed arguments have true conclusions.

Students' Questions That I Don't Answer

by Stephanie Simoes
One of my favourite parts of being a teacher is the interesting and sometimes even surprising questions my students ask me. Due to their enormous curiosity, children may ask some questions that adults find difficult to answer.

Denominator Neglect: A Poem

by Stephanie Simoes
Unlikely things are likely to happen when happening happens a lot.

How to Spot Pseudoscience

by Stephanie Simoes
Pseudoscience is not the same as bad science. This post covers what pseudoscience is (and is not) and how we can detect it.

The Socratic Method: Teaching Children through Guided Inquiry

by Stephanie Simoes
By asking a series of questions, you can guide students to knowledge they didn’t know they already had.

The Power of “I Don't Know” in Education

by Stephanie Simoes
As adults, we must not be embarrassed to say "I don't know" to children. Used correctly, this phrase can be a powerful educational tool, for several reasons.

Learning through Teaching

by Stephanie Simoes
Teaching equips students with essential life skills that extend far beyond the classroom.

How I Teach my Six-Year-Old about the Algorithm

by Jessica Silberman
You can encourage smart and thoughtful technology use in young children by adding in a few questions as you go about your normal day.

How to Type the Connective Symbols of Symbolic Logic

by Stephanie Simoes
A guide on how to type the connective symbols for symbolic logic, also called formal logic or sentential logic, on Mac and Windows.

The Two Child Problem: A Probability Puzzle in Three Parts

by Stephanie Simoes
The Two Child Problem shows us that our intuition can mislead us when thinking about probability.


Courses

Fallacy Detectors Part 1

Develop the skills to tackle logical fallacies through a series of 10 science-fiction videos with activities. Recommended for ages 8-12.

US$15

Symbolic Logic for Teens Part 1

Learn how to make sense of complicated arguments with 14 video lessons and activities. Recommended for ages 13 and up.

US$15

Worksheets

Symbolic Logic Worksheets icon

Symbolic Logic Worksheets

Worksheets covering the basics of symbolic logic for children ages 12 and up.

US$5

Elementary School Worksheets and Lesson Plans icon

Elementary School Worksheets and Lesson Plans

These lesson plans and worksheets teach students in grades 2-5 about superstitions, different perspectives, facts and opinions, the false dilemma fallacy, and probability.

US$10

Middle School Worksheets and Lesson Plans icon

Middle School Worksheets and Lesson Plans

These lesson plans and worksheets teach students in grades 5-8 about false memories, confirmation bias, Occam's razor, the strawman fallacy, and pareidolia.

US$10

High School Worksheets and Lesson Plans icon

High School Worksheets and Lesson Plans

These lesson plans and worksheets teach students in grades 8-12 about critical thinking, the appeal to nature fallacy, correlation versus causation, the placebo effect, and weasel words.

US$10

Statistical Shenanigans Worksheets and Lesson Plans icon

Statistical Shenanigans Worksheets and Lesson Plans

These lesson plans and worksheets teach students in grades 9 and up the statistical principles they need to analyze data rationally.

US$10